Trees and shrubs

Japanese maple: superb foliage


Flamboyant, Japanese maple is a beautiful shrub, thanks to the shape and color of its foliage.

In summary, what you need to know:

Last name : Acer japonicum
Family : Sapindaceae
Type : Tree

Height
: 8 to 10 m
Exposure : Partial shade
Ground : Ordinary, well drained

Foliage
: Obsolete

Japanese maple plantation

Japanese maple is plant in the fall but can also be planted in the spring when purchased in a container.

  • Japanese maple likes partially shaded situations.
  • Too sunny exposure could scorch the leaves.
  • Japanese maple dreads calcareous soils.
  • He also doesn't like situations subject to air currents or strong winds.

How to plant a Japanese maple tree:

In addition to the nature of the soil and the location, it is important to provide Japanese maple with the right elements for its growth as soon as it is planted.

  • Dig a hole 3 to 4 times the size of the root ball.
  • Bring a mixture of planting soil and heather soil.
  • Place the root ball in the middle of the hole.
  • Fill with the mixture without burying the base of the trunk.

Japanese maple in pot:

The cultivation of Japanese maple in pots is quite possible, it is even an ideal shrub for this.

  • Use a pot of sufficient size.
  • Make sure the pot is well drilled at the bottom (never use a pot with a water reserve)
  • Place a bed of clay balls or gravel at the bottom of the pot about 3 or 4 cm to ensure good drainage.
  • Fill the pot with a mixture of plantation type potting soil and heather soil

In soil or in pots, promote the development of the tree by putting a mulching at the foot of the tree which will keep moisture in the soil.

Caring for Japanese maple

Once properly installed and having respected the growing conditions, Japanese maple is easy to maintain.

The biggest growing mistake we see is related to watering.

Watering Japanese maple:

  • Keep the soil moist in summer by avoiding overwatering.
  • Japanese maple in pots should be watered as soon as the soil is dry on the surface.
  • Lack of water can burn the leaves.
  • In the event of strong heat, misting the foliage in the evening helps to cool the Japanese maple.

Japanese maple pruning

No size is really essential.

Your Japanese maple doesn't really like to be pruned and only old trees will need to be pruned in a measured manner.

If pruning is to be done, it should take place in winter, outside of periods of frost. Never prune outside of the period from November to March.

  • Start by disinfecting your pruning equipment thoroughly.
  • Remove old wood and dead branches.
  • Apply healing putty to avoid any risk of disease.

Japanese maple diseases

Japanese maple can be a victim of aphid attacks. these little green or black beasts colonize the leaves and can weaken your Japanese maple.

  • here's how fight effectively against aphids

If you see any branches turning black on your Japanese maple, they should be cut off at the base and destroyed.

Indeed, many maple trees are affected by a disease called verticillium, which is a fungus capable of devastating a maple tree in a few months.

As soon as you see your sick maple, burn the dry branches.

Here is also how to fight againstblack stains maple.

Good to know about Japanese maple

As the name suggests, this maple is native to Japan. Indeed, it is native to the undergrowth of Japanese forests.

It constitutes a major essence of the Japanese garden.

It has flamboyant hues in the fall, so it's a real festival of colors from the end of summer.

We are used to grouping together, under the name Japanese maple, all maple trees from this country.

We thus find both the acer japonicum, the acer shirasawanum or theacer palmatum.

Smart tip about Japanese maple

He likes acidic soils. A mixture of topsoil, potting soil and heather earth suits it perfectly!


© rootstocks

Video: Japanese Maple How to grow Japanese Maple Maple Fall color (October 2020).